How can we ensure that RC/HCs have a stronger understanding of the NGO community?

In addition to strategically engaging with the RC/HC, senior NGO representatives can seek to become RC/HCs themselves. The first NGO representative to be accepted into the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) Pool was in 2006. Since then, 2 more NGO representatives have been deployed as RC/HCs. NGOs have increased the number of qualified applicants that they submit annually for consideration into the HC Pool. In 2014 four NGO representatives were accepted. Upon deployment they are employed by UNDP.

Upon designation of new HCs, as well as selection of new RCs in countries of humanitarian concern, OCHA organizes on-boarding meetings in Geneva, Rome and New York for incoming HCs (and RCs) to become acquainted to their stakeholders. Those on-boarding programmes include systematically meetings with NGO partners active in the country of deployment. This is a good opportunity to engage with RC/HCs and increase their understanding of NGOs.

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Who do RHCs, a DRSG, a RC/HC and HCs report to?

Resident Coordinators report to the Secretary General through the UNDG Chair (who is the UNDP Administrator), through the Chairs of the Regional UNDG Teams (who are the UNDP Regional Bureau Directors). RCs have an additional reporting line to the ERC for the performance of humanitarian functions.

RC/HCs have a dual reporting line, to the Secretary-General/UNDG Chair for the performance of RC functions, and to the ERC for the performance of HC functions.

HCs, Senior HCs and Regional HCs report to the ERC.

DHCs report to the HCs in their respective country of assignment.

Deputy Special Representatives of the Secretary-General report to the Special Representative of the Secretary-General in their country of assignment.

DSRSG/RC/HCs have three reporting lines, to the SRSG for the performance of DSRSG functions, to the Secretary-General/UNDG Chair for the performance of RC functions, and to the ERC for the performance of HC functions.